Television Shows And The Adolescents

817 Words4 Pages
Does watching television make you smarter? Television shows are recurring television programs in the form of episodes and series. My own view is that the television show being watched is picked by whosoever is watching it. Different people watch television shows from different perspectives. It is their ability to decode the information being passed through the show, and understand it, that determines the type of television show they will like to watch. Television shows have a continuous effect on the adolescents, but the positive outweighs the negative. Family Guy, an ongoing show, which has won three primetime Emmys (IMDB), has had trouble resulting in the cancellation of the show twice, due to its “gags per minute about race, sex, incest, bestiality, etc.” (Peacocke 300), Stephen Dubner, co-author of Freakonomics, described Family Guy. This show “purposely offends just about every group of people you could name” (Peacocke 300), New York Times journalist, Stuart Elliot claimed. However, this satire show is rated for ages 14 and over even, though it is of an adult animation category. Family Guy produces comedy from the faults and imperfection of the U.S. society in a derisive and sometimes bigoted way. But some jokes, Antonia Peacocke, a student at Harvard University, said to be, “more tame and insightful, the kind you might expect from the New Yorker” (306). In other words, Peacocke believes Family Guy shows an accurate and deep understanding of the U.S. society, in the form of jokes. It is a show that could bring people to “easily come to think that the cartoon takes pleasure in controversial humor just for its own sake. But those who pay more attention and think about the creators’ intentions can see that Family Guy intellig... ... middle of paper ... ...es That Matter in Academic Writing. 2nd ed. 303. Print. 11 March 2014. —-. “Family Guy and Freud: Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious.” Is Pop Culture Actually Good for You? Russell Durst, ed. New York : W.W. Norton & Co., 2010. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 2nd ed. 306. Print. 11 March 2014. —-. “Family Guy and Freud: Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious.” Is Pop Culture Actually Good for You? Russell Durst, ed. New York : W.W. Norton & Co., 2010. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 2nd ed. 300. Print. 11 March 2014. —-. “Family Guy and Freud: Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious.” Is Pop Culture Actually Good for You? Russell Durst, ed. New York : W.W. Norton & Co., 2010. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 2nd ed. 300. Print. 11 March 2014.
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