THE STRENGTH OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN DURING THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

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The Industrial Revolution was a remarkable time in history because it led to a new source of energy, textile production, and the beginning of factories and mines around the world. By establishing factories and mines, many people were able to go to work and provide for their families after their spouses passed away. This enabled many women and men to establish work, wherein the past they had no way to provide for a household or themselves. Although the opportunity to establish work was often appreciated, there were consequences that went along with working at such establishments that many were not aware of. According to an interview conducted with Sarah Carpenter, after her father died when she was eight years old, her family was forced to live at mill house called Bristol Workhouse. Without Sarah’s mother’s permission, her brother was then taken in the middle of the night to work for Cressbrook Mill, which took many days to travel to find him. Sarah had a bond with her brother that was so strong, she decided not to leave him and she worked at the mill at the mill until she was twenty one. Sarah then became one of the many children who were employed at such a tender age. Another young worker named John Birley had a similar story to Sarah Carpenter. According to his interview with The Ashton Chronicle, Birley and his sister were taken to the Bethnal Green Workhouse to work after their mother fell ill when he was five. Although Birley did not have the choice to work as Sarah Carpenter did, he was still treated with respect, taught to read, and given days off two to three times per week. Originally, when children began to work in factories and mines, most master’s respected their workers, despite their age, and ever... ... middle of paper ... ... Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers 1842, Vol. XV, pp. 84, and ibid ., Vol. XV11,ed. by Paul Halsall, Internet Modern History Sourcebook, p. #108. Patience Kershaw , Two Women Miners, from Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers 1842, Vol. XV, pp. 84, and ibid ., Vol. XV11,ed. by Paul Halsall, Internet Modern History Sourcebook, p. #108. Betty Harris, Two Women Miners, from Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers 1842, Vol. XV, pp. 84, and ibid ., Vol. XV11,ed. by Paul Halsall, Internet Modern History Sourcebook, p. #108. Benjamin Miller, Underlooker at Mr. Woolley’s, near Staley Bridge, 14th April 1841, Testimony Gathered by Ashley’s Mines Commission (House of Commons, 1843), No. 7, p. #. Thomas Wilson, Esq., of the Banks, Silkstone, owner of three collieries, Testimony Gathered by Ashley’s Mines Commission (House of Commons, 1843), No. 137, p. #.

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