Symbolism And Symbolism In George Orwell's 1984

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Early in the story, the reader is told of Winston 's death. This occurs again in the book using symbolism. Winston’s obsession with the past and trust in a stranger are what leads to his immanent death. The song itself is not the memory of an old man, but more of a morbid warning to Winston. The picture which brings up the rhyme hangs on the wall in the room owned by Mr. Charrington. It is here that Winston and Julia have their secret rendezvous. Likewise, the paperweight is not a simple piece of coral enrobed with glass; it serves as a link to the past for Winston. This item, as well, is also linked to Mr. Charrington. George Orwell was born in India as Eric Arthur Blair on June 25, 1903. He died in London on January 21, 1950. He was a novelist,…show more content…
This occurs again in the book using symbolism. Winston’s obsession with the past and trust in a stranger are what leads to his immanent death. The song itself is not the memory of an old man, but more of a morbid warning to Winston. The picture which brings up the rhyme hangs on the wall in the room owned by Mr. Charrington. It is here that Winston and Julia have their secret rendezvous. Likewise, the paperweight is not a simple piece of coral enrobed with glass; it serves as a link to the past for Winston. This item, as well, is also linked to Mr. Charrington. Orwell uses symbolism throughout his story. The paperweight Winston espies in Mr. Charrington 's shop symbolizes a link to the past. It is also Mr. Charrington who sings the morbid rhyme "Here comes a chopper to chop off your head." This is important because by the time “1984” ends, Winston is no longer a unique individual. “the “last man’s head” is effectively “chopped off” and he becomes a faceless member of The Party.” (Scott,…show more content…
It is unclear as to who is the actual ruler of Oceania. Nobody speaks of their lives or what they do or why they act the way they do. Winston himself cannot recall exactly when Big Brother emerged. He believes it was 1960, yet the official records date the existence of Big Brother back to 1930, prior to Winston 's birth. Having been created from a dream, Winston ponders the phrase, “the place where there is no darkness” for the entirety of the book, never knowing for certain where this place is or what it means although he dreams that it is some type of paradise. In the end, it is just a prison cell with the lights left on day and night. Considering Winston thinks he is doomed no matter what he does, this may be the key reason he trusts O 'Brian when he knows deep down something is off about the man. Thus, the place where there is no darkness also symbolizes his approach to the

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