Superficial, Analytical, and Core Interpretations in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas

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In a complex world, are things as they seem, or are they a simple misconception? Without complexity there are limited possibilities to a simple stimulus. A limited world is a simple world, thus boring and unsatisfying. Thompson’s book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas has been misunderstood, and dismissed without further exploration, it needs to be analyzed and interpreted from three different aspects to acquire true apprehension : superficial, analytical, and core. Lead in “No, this is not a good town for psychedelic drugs. Reality itself is too twisted” (Thompson 47). Psychedelic drugs alter the perception of the user, thus twisting an already twisted community. Las Vegas is a strange and bazaar town, one could not foreshadow what lies beyond the next turn or bend in a conscious mind; to fathom being in the heart of this city, while in an altered state of mind due to the influence of psychedelic drugs is overwhelming. What is intriguing is this idea is conveyed in two sentences, but only if analyzed below the surface. This book has gold hidden beneath the words, ready for the harvest of the reader. These words lay to waste when they lack the attention of the reader, or to the superficial mind. Perception is reality, reality is what is perceived and altered accordingly. For example in Thompson’s book it is stated, “Always quit winners” (Thompson 72). Seems crude, does it not? Only at first, see the winners did not build Las Vegas, and winners are only winners while they are winning, but luck runs out. There may be even more to this than explained, less than explained, or the explanation is invalid to another perception. While in a drug induced psychosis, Duke tells his attorney, “No more of that talk, or I’ll put the leeches on I ... ... middle of paper ... ...ew, March 1990." Hunter S. Thompson. William McKeen. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1991. 105-109. Twayne's United States Authors Series 574. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 13 Jan. 2014. Metzger, Lynn. "Las Vegas in fiction and nonfiction." Bookmarks Sept.-Oct. 2012: 21+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 13 Jan. 2014. "Rolling Stoned." Hunter S. Thompson. William McKeen. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1991. 47-61. Twayne's United States Authors Series 574. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 13 Jan. 2014. Thompson, Hunter S. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream. London: Paladin Grafton, 1971. Print. "When the Going Gets Weird, the Weird Turn Pro”." Hunter S. Thompson. William McKeen. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1991. 101-104. Twayne's United States Authors Series 574. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.

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