Summary Of The Love Song Of J. Alfred Prufrock

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Fragmented experience is highlighted by the use of register and poetic form, in T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”. This fragmentation emphasizes the disjointed experience of the modern day world and lifestyle, and the experiences of those in it. Using a modernist style, T.S. Eliot emphasizes this fragmentation through form, meter and register, throughout the poem. T.S Eliot uses various forms, meters, and register throughout the poem. He uses rhyming couplets, which are often referred to as "heroic". The use of the “heroic” couplet serves as a mockery to the main protagonist of the poem, as Prufrock is not portrayed as heroic, nor does he view himself as heroic. Certain rhymes have a musical and childish quality, as if mocking…show more content…
The Oxford Dictionary explains register as “A variety of a language or a level of usage, as determined by degree of formality and choice of vocabulary, pronunciation, and syntax, according to the communicative purpose, social context, and standing of the user.” As discussed by Muhammad Saleem (2012), there is deviation of register in the title, as “The Love Song” is a romantic and poetic phrase, while the name “J. Alfred Prufrock” seems ordinary, unpoetic and unromantic, as if it does not belong in a love song. 'Pru ' indicates a sense of prudishness and the surname 'Prufrock ' indicates “prudence, primness, and prissiness”(Southam,1977, p.29). This creates a feeling of disjointment from the “Love Song”, which highlights that this is no ordinary and conventional love song, and that the title it is an intentional mockery of an ordinary, traditional love…show more content…
When discussing himself, Prufrock uses phrases such as 'a bald spot ', 'hair ', 'chin ', 'arms ' and 'legs ', which are ordinary, mundane and unheroic. These terms, as he refers to his own physiology, and himself, are lexical, while the more formal expressions of 'pin ', 'necktie ', 'coat ' and 'collar ', refer to the clothing that he wears. Prufrock sees his clothes as heroic, and not himself, which leads to the juxtaposition. Prufrock does not refer to himself as a whole, but rather, as the sum of several parts. This highlights the fragmentation that takes place throughout the poem. His clothing also seems to be viewed in a fragmented way, however, it is portrayed as heroic, while the description of Prufrock himself is not heroic at
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