Structural Model Of The Mind (E. The Id, Ego And Super Ego) Explains Our Behavior In Everyday Life.

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SOWK 506 Questions for Quiz #2 Unit 8 1. Describe how Freud’s structural model of the mind (i.e. the Id, Ego and Super Ego) explains our behavior in daily life? Just like the stages of brain development in neurobiology, Freud’s structural model of the mind (i.e. the Id, Ego, and Super Ego) goes through stages of development to create the true nature of a human being. The collective workings of the Id, Ego, and Super Ego create the ultimate “You.” Even though Freud’s theory may seem complex, his writings on psychosexual development stress how one’s personality develops. Freud believed that during these stages, a driving force developed. These driving forces are important to look at because they tell you how one interacts with the world. Freud believed that human beings were born with their Id; which makes sense because as newborns, our behavior demands that our basic needs are met. The Id is a pleasure seeker, which attempts to find satisfaction while disregarding reality, social norms, and consequences. Depending on the child’s wants and/or needs the Id will speak up until that void is filled. The Id not only ignores reality, but it is selfish. The…show more content…
This example illustrates how the ‘good enough’ mother is not over bearing and offers limited freedom and independence for a child to explore their curiosity. This gives the baby a sense of control and power; while establishing a comfortable relationship (bond) with its mother. This type of environment presented in the example referred to as ‘the holding environment’ allows an infant to transition at is own rate as it goes through the stages of

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