Strong Horse Tea, by Alice Walker and The Suicides of Private Greaves, by James Moffett

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Characterization in "Strong Horse Tea," by Alice Walker and "The Suicides of Private Greaves," by James Moffett Characterization is the change that occurs in a character throughout the story. The change can be either a physical one or an emotional one. In the stories "Strong Horse Tea," by Alice Walker and "The Suicides of Private Greaves," by James Moffett, the characters involved go through changes that effect both stories ending. Characterization also occurs in stories through the eyes of other characters and how they view the main person in a story. A character's change in the story will eventually lead to the resolution, and inevitably the end of the story. In "Strong Horse Tea" the main characters change is very evident. Rannie Mae Toomer's change in the story is apparent to the reader and audience. She (Rannie) goes through both an emotional change as well as a change in her beliefs (both spiritually and on how she viewed people.) Rannie is a black woman living in America during its oppressive years, with her only salvation being her infant son, Snooks. Her son is very sick and in desperate need of medicine. Rannie is convinced that a white doctor will come and visit her and take care of her son. Rannie, however, does not realize her situation, and hopes still that a doctor will come. "Lawd, why don't that doctor come on here?" Rannie keeps on hoping, and not allowing Sarah, the witch doctor to help her. Rannie believes that Sarah help will be evil, and that the white doctor will soon come. 'We going to have us a doctor,' Rannie Toomer said fiercly, walking over to shoo a fat winter fly from her child's forehead. 'I don't belive in none of that swamp magic.' Rannie is unaware of who she is and how others view her. She does not realize that the color of her skin is oppressing her. Rannie is convinced that the mailman (her only connection to the outside world) can help her out. The mailman, however, has other views about Rannie. He sees her as an animal ("Rannie Mae, leaning over him out of the rain smelt like a wet goat." ) with absolutely no intelligence ("Today he thought she looked more ignorant than usual^. ) Rannie is convinced that the mailman will get her doctor for her, but as the time passes she comes to the realization that Sarah is her only hope. 'But I told you,' Rannie Toomer said in exasperation, as if explaining something to

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