Soring in Gaited Horse Breeds Analysis

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In 2011, the United States government spent $750,000 to build a new soccer field at Camp 6 in Guantanamo Bay (Fox). While in the same year, only $500,000 was allowed for the protection of horses against a practice called “soring,” in which horses legs are purposely injured in order to create the ever famous fancy gait that spectators love to watch (15 USC). The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) needs more funding so that the Horse Protection Act (HPA) can be effectively enforced in Tennessee Walking Horse and Racking Horse shows. The results of the increase in budget allowance will provide better care, comfort, and overall well being of Tennessee walking horses and Racking horses by providing a sufficient number of certified veterinarians at shows. This issue is important and needs to be addressed because horses are suffering, and people are getting away with abuse, even though it is against the law.

The Tennessee walking horse is derived from six other horse breeds and first appeared in the middle part of Tennessee. The walking horse was originally bred for work because of its admirable stamina and willing attitude (Tennessee Walking Horse Heritage Society). The breed is an idea working, trail riding, and pleasure horse because of its personality and easy adaptability to both western and english riding styles. The walking horse displays several distinctive characteristics. A Tennessee walking horse stands between 14.3 and 17 hands high, with a hand measuring as four inches, and weighs between 900 and 1200 pounds. They have small heads with delicate ears, long sloping shoulders and hips, and a short but strong back and coupling (a part of the back closer to the tail). In addition, the side of his or her body closest...

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