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Sonnet 130 And The Long Love

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LOVE is word we Homo sapiens have defined and yet struggled to understand throughout time and different cultures. It is a word that can mean simultaneously both pain and ecstasy. Such a simple four-letter word has been the bane of some poet’s existence and at the same time been the muse for others. When pondered about, love can be determined as an easy emotion but at the same time vastly hard to achieve. This contradiction and overall ideology has been the topic of poets, writers and artist since humans first invented the word. Divided by two different artistic movements, both Sir Thomas Wyatt and William Shakespeare were no strangers to the subject of love. While Wyatt wrote primarily poems and is credited as the father of sonnets, Shakespeare wrote both plays and sonnets. Each author tackle’s the subject from there own prospective and offers their thoughts on what they think the word love means. Two sonnets that can represent both authors’ attitudes on love are Wyatt’s “The Long Love” and Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 130”. While some similarities between “Sonnet 130” and “The Long Love” are evident, the differences are striking. Both sonnets offering wonderful examples on what two brilliant minds think of the overdone and universal theme of love.

The quote: “The long love that in my thought doth harbor”, not only includes the title of the sonnet within the first line it also sets the tone for Sir Thomas Wyatt’s romantic and Petrarchan sonnet. From this line the reader right away gets a yearning feeling, an almost sad and melancholy feeling, because of the word long. If you were to remove the word long you would find that line too much more pleasant. This attitude is continued thought the sonnet and is one of the key differences betwe...

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... that doesn’t "treads on the ground.” love that is "as rare/ as any she belied " and no amount of visions of "a goddess" would change that.
In the end, what is seemingly two simple sonnets about love turn out to be two very different viewpoints on the topic: two men writing about a topic that clearly is important in their lives. Reading each poem is a gateway into the author’s mind, letting us see their own thoughts and feelings on the subject. Sir Thomas Wyatt seems to feel almost depressed and hopeless while understanding the rarity of finding true love. Where as Shakespeare is confident and realistic but also takes love for granted and doesn’t open up emotionally. Because love isn’t as simple and straightforward as most poets suggest, these two sonnets are great examples on how this universal and worldwide topic can be expressed in many different way.
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