Social Structure In Relationships, Patterns, And Social Formation

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Introduction Social Structure has different meanings according to certain scales. I have defined Social Structure in 4 different ways namely social science macro, meso and micro scales. In the Social Science, Social Structure is the patterned social arrangements in the society that are both up-and-coming from and factor of the actions of the individuals. On the macro scale, social structure is the system of the socioeconomic stratification (e.g. class structure). On the meso scale, it is the structure of social network ties amongst individuals or organizations. On the Macro scale, it can be the method norms shape the behaviour of factors within the social system. And Social Change may refer to the idea of social development or sociocultural…show more content…
Explain the meaning of Social Structure in terms of relationships, patterns, and social formation. Clarify your answer through examples. Social Structure is the framework of society that exists above the level of individuals and provides the social setting in which individuals interact with one another to form relationships. It includes the organizations, groups, statuses and roles, cultural beliefs and institutions that add order and predictability to our lives. The concept of social structure is important because it implies a patterned regularity I the way we live and in the way societies work. The term structure refers to the ways the parts of anything relate to one another. Social structure often remains much the same from one year to the next, despite constant minor changes and pressure for…show more content…
Because we live in a world that seems to be in constant state of change, we’re often tempted to believe that rapid social change is a fully modern issue. Keep in mind, however, that sociologists and other researchers have long expressed deep concern over the effects that social change has on people. The 19th century sociologist Emile Durkheim 91897/1510 argued that rapid social change creates an emptiness in norms, which he called anomie, where the old cultural rules no longer apply. When things change quickly-through sudden economic shifts, wars natural disasters, population explosions or rapid transitions from traditional modern society- people become disoriented and experience anomie as they search for new guidelines to govern their
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