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Social Mosticity Of Ancient Egypt

explanatory Essay
823 words
823 words
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The social norms of Ancient Egypt were exceptionally atypical from those of other nations at the time. In ancient Egypt, incest, female legal authority, female education, divorce, and promiscuity were all socially acceptable. Despite that, the social hierarchy was very similar to those of other societies at the time. Ancient Egypt had a “class” system. At the top was the pharaoh, or divine leader, and his family followed by the vizier, and then government officials, nobles, and priests. Below the priests soldiers, then scribes followed by merchants. After merchants were craftsmen and artists followed by fishermen and farmers, and at the bottom of all: the slaves, servants, and prisoners. The pharaoh had the most power of all humans in Ancient Egypt. He had many critical responsibilities. It was his duty to make laws and keep order. It was also his responsibility to prevent attacks from Egypt’s enemies and keeping the gods happy. The people believed that he was a god on earth. The vizier, also known as the High Priest, was the highest administrative official, only answering to the pharaoh. The vizier responsible for overseeing administration, approving official documents, overseeing the food supply and the operations and the defense of the Pharaoh’s household, and mediating quarrels between nobility. Nobles were in charge of overseeing and running Nomes, or the provinces of Egypt. They made local laws and were responsible for keeping peace and harmony in their Nome. While the nobles saw to the needs of the people, the priests kept the gods satisfied. They spent their time performing rituals in their respective temples. Since scribes were the only people who could read and write, they kept record of important information such as ... ... middle of paper ... ...est were almost always practiced to preserve the dynastic succession. In lower classes, it was not done as much and almost frowned upon. Any marriage was acceptable, as long as it produced children. A fertile woman was seen as a successful woman. Men felt the need to “prove themselves” by fathering as many children as possible. Because the infant morality rate was so high and many more children died before the age of five, there was not a concern for overpopulation. Ancient Egyptian society was unlike any other ancient society. It was much more lenient toward licentiousness and did not ostracize those who would be considered prostitutes or whores at that time period in any other country. It did not have any particular marriage ceremony nor gender preference for children. Ancient Egyptian society was also, by far, he most female friendly society of the Ancient World.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains the social norms of ancient egypt were atypical from those of other nations at the time. incest, female legal authority, education, divorce, and promiscuity were all socially acceptable.
  • Explains that ancient egypt had a "class" system. at the top was the pharaoh, or divine leader, followed by his family, government officials, nobles, and priests.
  • Explains that the pharaoh had the most power of all humans in ancient egypt. he had many critical responsibilities, such as making laws and keeping order.
  • Explains that the vizier, also known as the high priest, was the highest administrative official. he was responsible for overseeing administration, approving official documents, food supply, operations and defense of the pharaoh’s household, and mediating quarrels between nobility
  • Explains that nobles were in charge of overseeing and running nomes, or the provinces of egypt. they made local laws and were responsible for keeping peace and harmony.
  • Explains that since scribes were the only people who could read and write, they kept record of important information such as the amount of harvested food, soldiers in the army, gifts given to the gods, and workers.
  • Explains that craftsmen and artisans were skilled workers who often worked together in groups in workshops. by egyptian standards, they were rather well to do.
  • Explains that servants, slaves and prisoners of war were the lowest class of society in ancient egypt. they worked in mining, building projects, noble houses and the pharaoh.
  • Explains that it was possible to change social status, but uncommon. for the most part, one stayed in the same social class he or she was born into.
  • Explains that in ancient egyptian households, there was no gender preference for children. childbirth was both a happy and terrifying affair, with infant mortality rate being high.
  • Compares the life expectancy of upper class, peasants, and females to those of males.
  • Explains that it was not necessary to be virgin in order to marry and those who weren't were not looked down upon. premarital sex was socially acceptable, but fidelity to one's husband or wife was expected.
  • Explains that once a couple started living together, they were considered married. otherwise, there was no recorded marriage ceremony or registration.
  • Explains that even though marriage was no trivial matter, divorce was not rare. divorced people often remarried.
  • Explains that women got more out of a divorce than men. they could also serve in juries, testify in trials, inherit property, and disown children.
  • Explains that inbreeding and incest were practiced in higher classes to preserve the dynastic succession, while in lower classes, it was not done as much and almost frowned upon.
  • Explains that ancient egyptian society was unlike any other ancient society. it was more lenient toward licentiousness and did not ostracize those who would be considered prostitutes or whores.
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