Social Glue In Sociology Essay

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Social Glue in Sociology, that which forms the structure of society today, has many elements to its formation. Emile Durkheim, considered the 'Father of Sociology ' asked how society was possible rather than just how society had changed, which is Conflict Theorist and Sociologist, Max Webers ' theory in Sociology. Weber extended on theories of Sociologist Karl Marx. Durkheim described Social Cohesion, meaning a Unity of Masses that consists of a commonly shared moral or interest as one element of social glue that formed the structure of society today. Merriam-Webster. (2004). Merriam-Webster 's collegiate dictionary. Merriam-Webster. Durkheim theorized that to understand this a sociologist must "seek the explanation of social life in the…show more content…
pg. 417 (2013). Sociology. Pearson Higher Education AU. Additionally, throughout history individuals, governments, political parties, groups and corporations develop what is the structure of society, although each person is born into an existing structure, a collective consciousness, therefore, constrained by the world around them. Religious beliefs, environment, family beliefs, morals, family worldviews people are born into, as well as taught to, also instinctively learnt throughout childhood are an existing structure in place that is part of the social glue. In addition to access to education, employment availability, language, tradition, culture, laws, rules, regulations and individual access to healthcare and resources. We all conform to what is 'normal ' due to how the social structure has developed and formed throughout history. Sociologist, Emile Durkheim called this Mechanical…show more content…
Mcdonaldalisation, globalisation, de-globalisation, usage of and access to pharmaceuticals, consumption of alcohol, illegal drugs, easily accessible and efficient transport. Furthermore, political structures in place, the formation of global terrorist groups, numerous forms of criminal activity, destruction of nature and an increased use of natural resources also a rapidly growing percentage of society putting an emphasis on social class and consumerism. All certainly having an impact on how social identities have changed throughout history, with both the positives and negatives forming the social glue that structures modern society. Karl Marx who practised as a Scientist of Socialism had the belief society was divided into social classes where a desire for personal wealth was always increasing, caused by the continual inclination of private ownership of productive resources, political agendas and corporate greed. Marx also theorised the elite of society, also known as the upper class, were continuously increasing their personal
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