Singapore Airlines Case Analysis

1098 Words5 Pages
1. Introduction Since 1972, when Singapore Airlines (SIA) operated separately from the former Malaysia Airlines Limited, SIA’s management had successfully differentiated the airline from its competitors due to its top quality service. Over the years, larger capacity aircrafts were introduced, offering faster and more comfortable flights with the extension of services to many destinations. Subsequently, Singapore Airlines commenced operations from the new Terminal 2 at Singapore Changi Airport on November 1990. Early 2004, Singapore Airlines set a record for the world’s longest non-stop commercial flight from Singapore to Los Angeles. Once again, Singapore Airlines created history by being the first carrier to operate an all-Business Class…show more content…
They flew one of the youngest aircraft fleets in the world to destinations spanning a network spread over six continents, providing the high standards of care and service that customers have always wanted. SIA has been leading the way, and developed a reputation for being an industry trendsetter along the way (Singapore Air, 2015). Additionally, their ever-growing list of industry-leading innovations includes being the first one to offer free headsets, a choice of meals and free drinks in Economy Class as well as satellite-based inflight telephones that is uniquely introduced in 1991; plus SIA also has a comprehensive panel of world-renowned chefs, the International Culinary Panel, in developing inflight meals. Moreover, they are first to offer audio and video on demand (AVOD) capabilities on KrisWorld in all classes. Up to date, SIA ranked third among airlines in the Far East Asia region, behind Japan Air Lines and All Japan Airlines (Reference for Business,…show more content…
This is because almost all countries have a ‘national carrier’ – an airline that carries the country’s flag, is headquartered in the capital city, and represents that country (Riwo-Abudho et al, 2013). Given that these carriers are seen as representing the nation, they tend to receive a great deal of support from government, and globally, many remain government-owned (Beria, Niemeier, and Fröhlich, 2011). Furthermore, according to Chua (2015), Singapore Airlines is fully supported by the government as to develop its service culture; the government has opened seven schools to train staff in the core functional areas of cabin crew, flight operations, commercial training, information technology, security, airport services and
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