Similarities Between Jekyll And Hyde

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The Unwilling Sinner and the Respected Scientist It seems as if Robert Louis Stevenson is trying desperately to warn us about our own complex dual nature. In both of his works, “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde” and “Markheim”, Stevenson represents two analyses of doubles and split personas and the depiction of human nature. In Strange Case, Henry Jekyll, a respected scientist unwisely tries to separate his morality from his self-indulgence through the likes of the “bestial” and evil Edward Hyde. Moreover, in “Markheim”, the protagonist, Markheim, a thief, maneuvers his way into an antique store to supposedly buy a present for his illusory lady, when all long he’s only planning on slaughtering the owner and steal his goods. When the…show more content…
They both explore a similar theme with alike insights. In both fictions, Stevenson symbolizes the split allegiances of the two men who unquestionably cherish a false idea about who they are. They are both broken into two distinct personalities— the good and the evil, and they are both forced to make a choice between the two. Stevenson presents both men with the same internal conflict, and whereas Jekyll chooses to free himself of his evil entity, Markheim had no escape route and had no other choice but to deal with his conciseness. Consequently, the way they deal with their dual nature, specifically their wickedness, differ though different physicals mediums and object; while Jekyll’s evil nature is characterized by Edward Hyde, Markheim’s is by the hand mirror being held up to him by the shop…show more content…
But while one embodies his host immorality and calmly tramples little girl simply because they happen to naturally run into another on a corner street; the other, the visitor, represents something wholly different. Like Markheim describes him, he was “not of the earth and not of God” (Stevenson 94). Thus we could define the visitor as being the devil that Markheim see him as; just like Jekyll sees Hyde. But given how the visitor ultimately acts as “chief of justice” to and how he is joyed when Markheim hand himself in, we can argue that he isn’t in all evil. Perhaps, he can be best described as a clash between good and evil who acts as another mirror and enables Markheim to see his true self. Nonetheless how we describe Hyde or the visitor, their existence is dangerous to their respective hosts; because they both dared to show an aspect that neither Jekyll and Markheim wanted to
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