Sherlock: A Comparison Of Sherlock Holmes

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The critically_and_commercialy acclaimed BBC show Sherlock (2010-) is an innovative and modern adaption of Arthur Conan Doyle’s iconic detective character ,Sherlock Holmes, and the detective genre as a whole. The pilot episode ‘A Study in pink’ depicts the detective and crime genre in a subversive manner through the use of form, audience and social context. The show appeals to a contemporary audience by depicting sophisticated forms of technology, informal language, and a modernised London setting. The contemporary adaption of Arthur Conan Doyle’s short stories revitalises the detective character white remaining faithful to the source material. The episode effectively presents the iconic detective as an unconventional hero who is trying to…show more content…
Sherlock has utilised a wide array of cinematic techniques to depict the unique characteristics of the show, specifically the central characters, Sherlock and Watson. ‘Sherlock’ utilises close ups to emphasise a characters emotional state. This technique effectively displayed the effect of post-traumatic stress on Doctor Watson’s emotional state and Sherlock’s unstable emotions due to the effects of isolation. Close ups are also used in conjunction with the screen text to display the effect of Sherlock’s train of thought on his emotions. Medium shots are heavily used to show Sherlock and Watson’s movement and gestures during a scene in response to the situation. The confrontation between Sherlock and the antagonist cab driver utilised a medium shot effectively to display Sherlock’s despair and uncertainty. The show utilises a muted colour palette to symbolise despair and hopelessness as it intensifies the mystery seen throughout the episode. Effective use of cinematic shots has allowed the viewers to connect to the characters on a deeper…show more content…
The show’s implementation of Shakespearean banter, crime scenes and dead bodies making the show appealing to a mature audience. Sarcasm, irony and British slang are heavily used in the show especially during conversations between Sherlock and Watson. Sherlock and Watson constantly use hostile and colourful language, effectively reflecting on the modern British culture. Dry humour is continuously present being in conjunction with epigrammatic humour. For example when Dr Watson asks Detective Inspector Lestrade why he deals with Sherlock’s eccentric and egotistical behaviour, Lestrade answers “Because I'm desperate, that's why. And because Sherlock Holmes is a great man, and I think one day, if we're very, very lucky, he might even be a good one.” DI Lestrade utilises dry humour while making a witty comment about Sherlock’s intelligence and his morality. Viewers of the show would not have any problems comprehending the content of the episode without prior knowledge of the original short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. However prior fans of Sherlock Holmes will appreciate, the show’s successful effort to remain true to the source material while effectively adding a modern twist on the classic short stories. The language used effectively appeals to a mature
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