Self-Destructive Masculinity In Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

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Effects and Consequences of Self-destructive Masculinity According to Webster’s dictionary, a tragic hero can be defined as a protagonist who is otherwise perfect except for flaws that are intrinsic to his or her character, which often leads to his or her demise. In Chinua Achebe’s novel, Things Fall Apart, Okonkwo, the protagonist is unlike tragic heroes such as Beowulf and Oedipus because he is not born into nobility, but has to rise to fame and earn respect through his hard work and his unrivaled success in defeating, the famous Amalinze the Cat. Like Beowulf and Oedipus, Okonkwo shares traits that are characteristic of a tragic hero. These traits reveal his mortal fear of failure and his fear of becoming like his father who is considered…show more content…
A proud person always considers himself or herself superior to others even though the case might not be quite true. In most cases they are trying to cover up their insecurities and giving themselves confidence that they do not have. The result of this behavior is always the opposite of what is expected by the person. Like the Bible says in Proverbs 16:18, Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall, this is reflected in the course of Okonkwo’s life. Okonkwo’s pride not only leads to his suicide, but also interplays with his fear of failure where he places himself on a position where he is not seen as weak or…show more content…
Filled with fear, Okonkwo draws his machete and cuts him down. He is afraid of being perceived as weak (61). After he kills Ikemefuna, he experiences severe depression, which affects him psychologically. His killing of Ikemefuna is significant, because although he does it to reinforce his sense of strength, it also reveals a weakness in Okonkwo that prevents him from being
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