Scout's Childhood Simplicity in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

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The adult world is a cold and terrifying place. There are robberies, shootings, murders, suicides, and much more. If you were to be a small child, perhaps age 5, and you were to look in at this world, you would never know how bad it actually was, just from a single glance. Children have a small slice of ignorant bliss, which helps to keep them away from the harsh of reality. It isn’t until later, when they encounter something that opens their eyes and shows them, that they truly start to understand the world we live it. Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird shows the many differences between the simplicity of being a kid and the tough decisions and problems that adults must face every day.

Jean Louise Finch, or Scout, is a very innocent character. Some of the time she does not understand what is going on in the world around her until her father, Atticus, explains it to her. Scout is innocent in that she does not understand what she is doing or what impact her words have on others, but she is not as innocent as some other children are. Atticus always explains things to her, and therefo...

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