Salinity In The Central Valley Case Study

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Salinity in the central valley: A critical problem The Water Education Foundation published an article on excess salinity that is in the water here in the valley. Too much intake of salt can be a problem, and that is what is happening here in the Central Valley. “Excess salinity – that which is greater than the standard set to protect beneficial uses – poses a growing threat to food production and drinking water quality.” If there is no solution to the problem, California will lose significant portions of prime agricultural land. In a March 2009 study, “The Economic Impacts of Central Valley Salinity, the University of California, Davis reported that if salinity increases at the current rate until 2030, the direct annual costs will range from…show more content…
According to Patrick Carroll, the first and by far the most important early water-related problem in California was that of reclaiming the swamp of the Sacramento Valley and the subsequent efforts in flood control . The second problem was the ‘debris’ that ‘hydraulic mining’ deposited in the rivers. The third was the problem of inland navigation. He reports about the new Engineering Department and how they were “tasked with investigating how hydraulic mining was impacting agriculture.” Hydraulic mining was a technique developed in California that “capturing water upstream from the mining site and transporting it by drains downhill, where it was funneled into houses and then released at great force through water cannons…show more content…
Of the lack of winter storms and record high temperatures, snowpack in California it is at an all-time low. When surface water supplies are low, hidden water supplies beneath the surface in aquifers, or groundwater, are drilled to make up the shortfall. The third is that while “25 percent water use restrictions announced last week are intended to help reduce demand, most of the water in California is used for farming”. California is not the only state in the west facing water supply issues. The Colorado River Basin, which supplies water to Phoenix, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and San Diego, have also been in a “drought for more than a decade, and the river basin’s aquifers have been declining too”. California first faced the drought in the 1970s, “fewer than 20 million people lived in the state, and now nearly 40 million live there
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