Rousseau Political Society

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The goal of laws in any legitimate political community is to protect the liberty and freedom of all citizens who live within any distinct regional territory. These laws install a society of shared co-operation through a social contract, which integrates each member in its society to live and work together in peace and harmony. Although Rousseau strongly supports every aspect of the social contract he brings up an interesting argument related to the social effect of class struggle that emerges after forming a legitimate political community particularly brought on by the property owning class. Keep in mind for these laws to gain any degree of legitimacy in any kind of political community it must satisfy two criteria. The first begins with the…show more content…
Rousseau found that once a man gets to become satisfied with living in civil society these laws restrict human nature 's basic freedom and equality, subsequently causing citizens to trade away their personal freedoms that tempt them so that they are protected by the state. As a result, when people remove themselves from their wild nature people eventually become weaker than a contrast to their primitive state. Rousseau exhibits this in his quote “ the horse, the cat, the bull, even the ass, are usually taller, and all of them have a more robust constitution, more vigor, more strength, and more courage in the forest than in our homes. They lost half of these advantages in becoming domesticated” (50). He uses this as an analogy to explain how the construction of politically organized societies lead to a moral destruction among men, which contradicts the condition of nature. Before the foundation of civil society this sort of corruption did not exist in nature. People no longer possess the same moral attitudes prior to in their state of nature, which is referred to as amour propre also known as self-love. In civil society this amour propre winds up getting lost and, “ this latter type of inequality consists in the different privileges enjoyed by some at the expense of others, such as being richer, more honored, more powerful than they, or even causing themselves to be obeyed by them”

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