Rosa Parks

1349 Words6 Pages
In the 1960’s segregation, which was later on known as, “Separate but equal” played a major role in the everyday lives of African Americans. African Americans turned to the courts to help protect their constitutional rights. Although the courts did not rule in the favor of African Americans. The jury and the courts decided that permitted states have to segregate people of color so conflict would be lowered.
African Americans were not allowed to have the same privileges as Whites. They did not have the same education privileges, many African- Americans were not even allowed to check out books at the library. They were forced to read them at the library and if they took them out of the library they got in trouble. African- Americans were not
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She worked as a seamstress for the Montgomery Fair department store. During her job, Rosa witnessed a lot of violence in the department store, especially while she grew up as a child. Her encounters with injustices against African Americans allowed her to set a goal to turn the violence into a productive action. Rosa Park quoted “I set my mind to be a free person and not to give in to fear. I always believed it was my right to defend myself if I could.” Rosa parks did not want violence to spread. Like many African- Americans, she only wanted to be treated…show more content…
She knew that unfairness, would not prosper so she stood her grounds. The decision that Rosa Parks made changed history forever, her supporters who stood by her also had an effect on the treatment of African- Americans today.
The NAACP noticed how active Rosa Parks was in the local NAACP chapter. They thought she would be the perfect example, to prove to the court system why African-American justice is important. After Rosa Parks arrest, other African-American activists immediately called for a bus boycott. The boycott was held on December 5, which was also Rosa Parks’ court date. The members of the NAACP spread the word about the boycott by posting and giving out fliers and having other activists promote the idea.
The first day of the bus boycott was a great success, people participating in the boycotts with cars would pick up or drop off others. Many people walked great distances to and from work. African-Americans stopped shopping in white owned stores as much as possible during this time, African-Americans sometimes had to walk even farther to find the items they
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