Romeo And Juliet Symbolism Analysis

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In writing we use symbols to effectively convey hidden meanings in stories and poems that can’t normally be read or understood. William Shakespeare’s tragic love story, “Romeo and Juliet,” has many symbols and is a great example of the use of symbolism. The three symbols that “Romeo and Juliet” are well-known for is love (Cupid), poison, and death. William Shakespeare if very well known for the symbolic use of love within his works of literature, along with a tragic ending (ex. “Hamlet”). This use of symbolism reoccurs in “Romeo and Juliet” and does not fail to deliver. However, love is represented symbolically by Cupid rather than Ophelia’s Flowers in “Hamlet”. Shakespeare uses the symbol of Cupid not only to represent love, but also as a method to develop theme and plot. Cupid also symbolizes the fickle nature of love, and how quickly changing it is. In the play Mercutio says, "You are a lover, borrow Cupid 's wings, And soar with them above a common bound" (Shakespeare I.iv.17-18). Mercutio also keeps telling Romeo to fall in love with another woman in order to get over Rosaline. The theme of ever-changing love develops because of this, even when Romeo claimed…show more content…
The symbol of poison represents the love between Romeo and Juliet. An example is when Romeo says, "Here 's to my love! O true apothecary! Thy drugs are quick. Thus I die with a kiss (Shakespeare.V.iii.119-120). Romeo takes the poison when he arrives at Juliet’s tomb and finds her dead. When Romeo takes the poison, it is revealed that he truly loves Juliet and that he is unable to live without her. The symbol of poison not only represents the love between Romeo and Juliet, but it can also represent the Capulet and Montague feud. Not only is the feud deadly in itself, — recall Mercutio 's death — it 's also the catalyst for Romeo and Juliet 's double
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