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Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner: Technology's Link to Humanity

Many years after its release, Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner has become one of the most analyzed and debated science fiction films ever produced. The film was a failure during its initial release in 1982, the reviews were negative and it wasn’t even close to being a box office hit; however, after the director’s cut release in 1992 Blade Runner had a rebirth and it became a highly respected science fiction film. Ridley Scott’s inspiration to produce Blade Runner came from Philip K. Dick’s 1969 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Although the screen writers for Blade Runner mostly just took the main character from Dick’s novel, they added certain key topics that kept a relationship between the two. At the film’s premier Harrison Ford said, “It's a film about whether you can have a meaningful relationship with your toaster.”[1] Despite Ford’s reference the film is very sophisticated in respect its visionary portrayal of the consequences of technology on humanity. A central ethical question that Blade Runner raises as well as in many other popular science fiction novels and films is what the boundaries of humanity are? Blade Runner’s answer is that humanity can expand to occupy many forms and human nature reached the point where genetic engineering, human biology, and digital technology are now an important part of society.

In Philip K. Dick’s time science fiction writers that rose to fame in the 1950’s were concerned with the physics of science while Dick was more concerned about the metaphysic of it. One of the most important ideas transferred over from Dick’s novel to Blade Runner is “the problematic nature of the human being and the difficult task of being human.”[2] The film’s themes of gene...

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..., History and Memories Join Together from The People History Site. Web. .

[9] "1980s History including Popular Culture, Prices, Events, Technology and Inventions." Where People, History and Memories Join Together from The People History Site. Web. .

[10] Senior, W. A. Blade Runner and Cyberpunk Visions of Humanity." Film Criticism V21 (Fall 1996): 1-12

[11] "1970s History including Popular Culture, Prices, Events, Technology and Inventions." Where People, History and Memories Join Together from The People History Site. Web. .

[12] Slade, Joseph W. "Romanticizing Cybernetics in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner." Literature Film Quarterly 18.1 (Jan 1990): 2-64

[13] Slade, Joseph W. "Romanticizing Cybernetics in Ridley Scott's Blade Runner." Literature Film Quarterly 18.1 (Jan 1990): 2-64

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