Representation In Morocco By Edith Wharton

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Introduction : Representation has been a major concept in the field of cultural studies. Many philosophers and writers wrote about this concept from different levels and perspectives. In an overall view, it is how a certain aspect of life is represented, how do we reflect and construct reality. This research deals with a certain aspect of representation which is related to the country of Morocco. How Morocco is represented in the eyes of others. How some people, authors, travel writers and people who have been here in a specific period of time reflect Morocco. Indeed, many books have been published about Morocco and Moroccan people, this research deals with one perception of Morocco among others. In Morocco by Edith Wharton gives a certain…show more content…
This book is devided to three sections. In the first section she describes the cities and the ruins in a dreamy poetic way and also mentioned a few shots of her mysterious own experience . In the second section describes her visits to the women’s quarters (harems) and some of her critics toward it, this part show mostly her personal opinions. In the third and section she provides different basic information, ranging from modern history, politics and ancient history and the history of art. This book describes Morocco an accurate description and in-depth. Edith mentioned every detail about every city she is in, starting from the architectural designs, the markets, experience of the Harems, the Sultan the custom of sitting on the roofs , the food, the local flavor , the sacrificial of the sheep in our religion feast and the history of Morocco. She also mentioned some realistic and beautiful moments in her travel such us the rising and setting of the sun. However, in Wharton’s writting there is a sense of racism and western superiority. Her attitudes toward the people has a sense of superiority and arrogance and a sound a…show more content…
However, it was easy to notice her pro-colonial stance. Her majority of racism and western superiority is very obvious. By focusing on the chapter that talks about Meknes and Moulay Driss you Wharton’s gives a snapshot of an exotic city in the midst of colonialism, a look on a cliff notes of a city long and complicated
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