Religion and Hate Crimes

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In 2007, according to the Federal Bureau Investigation of the Nation’s law enforcement agencies “there were 9,535 victims of hate crimes; of these victims17.1 percent were victimized because of a bias against a religious belief which totaled to be 1,628 victims of an anti-religious hate crime” (1). Almost ten thousand people were victims of hate crimes alone in 2007. That is something to be alarmed about because part of living in the U.S.A as minority is to have freedom to do and be anything you want and yet we find that you really don’t have that freedom because you get attacked for practicing that freedom. The increasingly rate of hate crimes is soaring that many states like New York, New Jersey and California now have the highest number of hate crimes committed due to religion (“Hate Crimes”). Religion is a major contributor into hate crimes against other people and religions. These acts are defended because they are believed to be true for the offender. Because of religion, hate crimes are still very much prevalent in society.

Hate crime according to Perry’s book, In the Name of Hate: Understanding Hate Crimes, is “a mechanism of power intended to sustain somewhat precarious hierarchies, through violence and threats of violence. It is generally directed toward those whom our society has traditionally stigmatized and marginalized” (3). This means according to Perry that using hate crimes against people of color, ethnic and religious backgrounds are reminded of their place and if they step out of that place they will be reminded using not so-friendly reminders (5). These not so friendly reminders can be from assault to even murder. Victims of hate crimes have the right to do what they want no matter what and should not be forc...

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