Reflection Analysis

919 Words4 Pages
I would like to start this paper by saying what a great piece of literature it is. When I started reading this book, I finished it in one day for the simple fact that I could not put it down. This book gave me a whole new view of life and how sacred it is. It also taught me how to not live my life in fear of dying, but embrace death while living. Of the many lessons, the one that reached out a grabbed my mind along with my heart was the lesson on emotion. In this paper, my goal is to reflect this lesson of Professor Morrie Schwartz to all who read my work. I will do this by first stating the main points given by a dying man on emotions and how we should absorb them every day and continue with my own personal experience of his words. “The Sixth…show more content…
While talking with him, he noticed how Morrie was coughing more often than usual, causing him shortness of breath and fatigue. Despite how crummy he felt, he leaned his head back, closed his eyes, and took a deep breath. When he was finished, he told Mitch that he was “detaching myself from the experience” (Albom, M., 1997). Confused, Mitch asked him what he meant by that. His old professor had just spent previous Tuesdays telling him the importance of experiencing every emotion, even the bad ones. But now he’s saying you must detach yourself? It just didn’t make sense. But when Morrie explained it to him in a way he could better understand, it clicked. Not only did it click for Mitch, it clicked for me as the…show more content…
He continued this thought by expressing the most fearful moments of his sickness – the fear, the worry, the anxiety, the pain. Then he would tell of the way he didn’t let them consume him; they didn’t let them become part of him. Instead, he allowed them to temporarily “wash over” him from head to toe so he could discover their feel, their density, and the feelings that accompanied them so he could tell himself that this is what each emotion felt like. In knowing how each emotion felt, he would be able to tell himself that this was just fear, for example, and only then could he detach himself from it. Being detached from something, he mentioned, does not mean you don’t let the experience penetrate you. Rather, it means you must let it penetrate you further until you feel it in it’s entirety so that you can let it go. As Morrie mentioned many times throughout their Tuesday visits, “When you learn how to die, you learn how to live” (Albom, M.,
Open Document