Reconstruction: The Promises And Failure Of Reconstruction

807 Words4 Pages
Despite all of Reconstruction’s promises and successes, the era included many failures, too. One such failure was the formation of the Ku Klux Klan and other racially prejudiced groups in the South that promoted violence towards African Americans. Another failure involved the corruption seen during Reconstruction by both the North and South. The carpetbaggers who were Northerners helped spread corruption in the Reconstruction Era by moving from their home state in the North securing a political office or position in the South to carry out the plans of the Radical Republicans. In the South, many local governments disenfranchised or created poll taxes for African American voters enabling them to vote. Ultimately, Reconstruction failed in changing…show more content…
Reconstruction failed because of the North’s and South’s inability to come together on political, economic, and cultural issues during the rebuilding process in the post-war years. Though the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments abolished slavery and permitted rights for African Americans in the South, the establishment of such laws as the Black Codes by Southern State Governments inhibited African American’s freedom. Among regulating their right to vote, marry, and own property, the codes affected African American’s ability to earn jobs, which eliminated the black workforce, so it did not pose a threat of competing with white individuals who were seeking jobs. Economic progression in the South proved to be a failure during Reconstruction, due to the inability of the two sides’ coming together to an agreement on how the South should rebuild. Industrialization in the South only progressed as a stipulation from the Compromise of 1877, in which the Federal Government agreed to take the steps to help implement the…show more content…
Bruce Catton made the statement that when the two sides of the nation went to war they destroyed one America, inventing another, which is still forming in the present. The war changed the political aspect of the country expanding the federal government. While local state governments still exist in the present, its power had, is much more restricted than what it was in the pre-war years. Such examples like the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments were passed during Reconstruction; they showed the power that the federal government had in post-war America. Though the amendments promised voting rights and anti-discrimination laws towards African Americans, the federal government forced the Southern States to accept these amendments amongst other regulations to become part of the Union, showing the true power that the government had over the nation and the states. Society and the economy of the nation were have affected the South though farming and sharecropping still existed, life like that of the Antebellum years was over, leading to industrialization to begin to take place in the South. Such social issues as racism still affect and affected the nation well into the mid-twentieth century with the rise of the Civil Rights Movement, which saw its main emphases of events in the 1950s and
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