Reasons In Plato's Apology By Socrates And Crito

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In Plato‘s the Apology, Plato describes that Socrates is sentenced to death of the crime of “corrupts the youth and does not believe in the gods the state believes in, but in other new spiritual beings” (24c). In Plato’s the Crito, Crito who is the faithful friend of Socrates is attempting to rescue him. However, Socrates still manifests that he will not leave Athens and he would rather take the death penalty magnanimously. The quotation of the Laws of Athens is the part of the conversation between Socrates and Crito under this situation. In this paper, I am going to argue that the Laws of Athens are not totally correct here, the objection is more successful than the Laws. According to the previous conversation, in my opinion, I think…show more content…
When Crito is attempting to convince him to flee, Socrates refutes by showing the reactions that the Athens’s citizens may behave that “What are you intending to do? By attempting this deed, aren’t you planning to do nothing other than destroy us, the laws, and the civic community, as much has you can? Or does it seem possible to you that any city where the verdicts reached have no force but are made powerless and corrupted by private citizens could continue to exist and not be in ruins” (50b)? According to this conversation, the reason for Socrates to should be that he wants to keep up the dignity of the Laws of Athens and the city instead of destroying them. If he just escapes for the jail, this behavior will challenge the Laws of the city, destroy the law systems and make himself…show more content…
The people in Athens are still respect him, that is why they will treat him seriously and put him in jail. Drifting away the idea of justice, Socrates’s idea challenges the society. Each society has its limit to tolerate, the behavior of Socrates provoke the authority of Athens openly. In this case, Socrates die for the insistence of his own
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