Racism In Huck Finn Essay

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Literature has many different point of views, from which a reader can develop certain conclusions, theories, or ideas. At times those same pieces of work that inspire many can also bring a negative light onto others, resulting in the work being offensive. Many factors are taken into consideration when analyzing a work that causes a stir amongst readers, such factors as the author 's background, life experiences, encounters with different people, and also the time period it was written in. In the case of Mark Twain 's, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, its literary content causes much conflict amongst readers and has sparked an ongoing debate. Many argue that the work promotes racism through the casual use of the word "nigger" which is derogation…show more content…
By 1884 Twain, after establishing himself into the art with multiple books, novels, and poems, finished his most famous piece, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which he published at the age of 49. Although it has become an American classic, it has triggered as aforementioned, a controversy over its casual and constant use of the word "nigger". Such content, although it exemplifies the time period and uses derogative language, is not racist. The story encourages civil rights and equality amongst African-Americans and other…show more content…
Finn is unaware that he is unaware that his attitude is wrong and doesn 't know how to deal with Jim (Fiskin 2). Being a product of his environment and racist upbringings, Finn then begins to entrap Jim in a dialogue that manipulates his appearance of being foolish. Finn then becomes guilty and feels bad for making Jim 's look foolish. "It made me feel something I could almost kiss my foot to get him to tackle it back. It was 15 minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and I warn 't even sorry for it afterward, neither. I didn 't do him no more mean tricks, and I wouldn 't done that one if I 'd a knowed it would make him feel that way (Twain 148)." This is where Twain makes Finn gain a sense of loyalty and friendship to Jim, after recognizing the inequality he
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