Racism, Characters, and Abuse in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1366 Words6 Pages
In To Kill a Mockingbird many things occur to be simple and everyone’s happy but it’s not always peachy in Maycomb Alabama.
To Kill a Mockingbird tells of a little girl’s love for her family and life living in a racist community filled with judgmental people (Shackelford). This was the time were black people were treated unfairly in courts especially in Alabama (Johnson). Alabama was the most racist part of the south everything was separated and blacks were treated like dirt that the whites walked on. In the book blacks did not have many rights and had to be servants and workers for the whites.
During this time in the south between the life in the house and outside the house racism was very known (Watson). People didn’t really want black people in restaurants or anything else because they didn’t like the black people. Racism was so bad that many blacks had freedom but no rights in courts, restaurants, and even walking down the streets. Many African Americans wanted to discuss the problem of racism books in class to know what happen during that time (Saney).
During the 50’s in the south the racism was still high but in a court case “separate but equal” meant that the blacks and whites where still segregated but equal in the courts (Chura). In To Kill a Mockingbird Lee shows what’s really going on and goes over the boundaries to teach people about their selves (Metress). She shows how racism has affected the world and how it has change the world and shows that there is still racism in Alabama.
Slavery has been going on a while and the people were fed up with it so they begin to fight back and show how they felt in Alabama and against racism as many blacks marched and did sit ins for their rights. Many whites still did not wan...

... middle of paper ...

...terary Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 194. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Smykowski, Adam. "Symbolism and Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird." Readings on "To Kill a Mockingbird". Ed. Terry O'Neill. San Diego, Calif.: Greenhaven Press, 2000. 52-56. Rpt. in Contemporary Literary Criticism. Ed. Jeffrey W. Hunter. Vol. 194. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Watson, Rachel. "The view from the porch: race and the limits of empathy in the film To Kill a Mockingbird." The Mississippi Quarterly 63.3-4 (2010).: 419+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Zaidman, Laura M. "Harper Lee: Overview." Twentieth-Century Young Adult Writers. Ed. Laura Standley Berger. Detroit: St. James Press, 1994. Twentieth-Century Writers Series. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
Open Document