Queen Elizabeth Masculinity Analysis

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When Queen Elizabeth I ascended on the throne in 1588, she was meant challenged by beliefs about gender. She was a female monarch, but in a world dominated by men. During the 1500s, women’s role were constrained because society saw woman as lacking understanding, ethics, and judgement compared to men. The culture of the middle ages prioritized the position of men that most women were denied the chance to learn beyond. Any education was meant to prepare women for marriage and children. And yet, you would think that being a part of the upper class Elizabeth would have access to all the learning possible, but even she was subjected to just tutors. She not only fought against her gender roles, but she also used them as a political and diplomatic…show more content…
al., p. 392). A prime example of her exhibiting her masculinity is during her speech to the troops of Tisbury. The purpose was to prepare for an invasion by the Spanish Armada and to dismiss any thoughts that being a woman meant she was less than a King. In her remarks to the English soldiers, Elizabeth tackles the obvious and disproves it. What boggles readers like me, is that she apologizes for being a woman. “I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too…” (Elizabeth, Doc 2). Words carry enormous weight. Queen Elizabeth’s remarks to her troops inspired them to action. She questioned who would “dare invade their borders of her realm” and threatened; “I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field” (Elizabeth, Doc 2). As queen, her passion for the State and her people is indisputable. “…to live and die amongst you all; to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust” (Elizabeth, Doc 2). She may not be with them in flesh, but what mattered was her sprit (her dedication) that fought alongside her people. Queen Elizabeth not only gave a great speech, but she also looked the part. Most likely mounted on her horse,…show more content…
To not be perceived as weak, she had to show her masculinity with everything she executed. She was both queen and king. With all her triumphs and feats, no wonder why The Elizabethan Era is considered as the Golden Age. I think what made Queen Elizabeth so influential was her pledge and passion for the people of England. It’s evident in all four documents that she put her state first. She even valued their well-being then her own. Through her speeches and portraits, Elizabeth was able to illustrate manliness to give her more control and respect. Without her self-confidence, who knows where England would have
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