Pros And Cons Of Electronic Health Records

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Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have drastically changed health care. From quality to efficiency, EHRs have transformed Health Care from an inaccurate, inefficient, and problematic system to a system that is much more reliable. Electronic Health Records do have their drawbacks; however, they are much more reliable than a paper system. Through the Affordable Care Act the government is now requiring EHRs to be implemented to receive benefits. Not only that, but the clinic will receive benefits per physician for implementing earlier than other clinics. Meaningful Use may be coming to an end, but many clinics have already implemented a system, which will carry on the policy for years to come. Two main jobs have been created from this: Health Informaticians…show more content…
According to Time Magazine, 1.5 million people are injured or killed from preventable medicinal mistakes. Meaningful Use is a policy, put in place by the government, to prevent these clinical errors. Many preventable medicinal mistakes are not necessarily due to carelessness, but to illegible handwriting for prescriptions, conflict of prescriptions, or lack of data. Meaningful Use requires a medical clinic to implement an Electronic Health Record (EHR) to store the Patient Health Information (PHI). By doing so, this creates a much more reliable order, thus reducing fatalities from those listed above. Electronic Health Records have greatly changed Health Care, from cost benefits to quality of care, benefiting both the patient and the clinic. The United States as a whole has been working to implement these systems for the past several years. This report will discuss what an Electronic Health Record is, what it does, and the results of this in the United…show more content…
Non-digital copies of health records include many problems. These often include misread prescriptions (totaling 100,00 deaths per year (Caplan, 2007), lost data, inefficient way to save data, which can often result in missing information, and many other things. The biggest problem being misread prescriptions, making it one of the highest causes of death in America, with mobility and mortality costs totaling $77 billion per year from these (McKesson, 2016). The government is now enforcing implementing these systems, or providers will no longer receive payment Medicaid or Medicare and will be fined. With this, medical clinics are rushing to implement an EHR, without fully understanding what is important or the background behind the systems, which results in picking the cheapest system. This will cause greater problems in the future, as opposed to losing benefits from Medicare and Medicaid, as the clinic will most likely have to pay for another system in the
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