Pragmatic Model Of British Petroleum

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Some pragmatic models related to corporate social responsibility are present which are dependent on the approaches that are socially oriented. The first model states that CSR is the set of particular activities, which includes charitable donations, racial and gender diversity, human rights, and environment. These activities must be focused by the organisations for the welfare of the society. The organisation is responsible to consider these activities so that helpful hands are delivered to the society (Zu, 2008). While on the other hand, another model related to CSR argues that the main dimension of corporate social responsibility are the business ethics. The main focus is on the issues related to stakeholders along with the compliance of ethical…show more content…
The primary objective of this re-examination is to change the discernment the general population with respect to BP regarding its business operation and its part in the general public. In addition, this revaluation is additionally a part of the adherence of the organisation to their social responsibilities and which costs around two-hundred million (Mohr, Sengupta, & Slater, 2009). Furthermore, the British petroleum was the first oil industry, which began to address the issue of worldwide environmental change. It can be said that the corporate social responsibility challenge for the British petroleum has been threefold. The first is to the test of interpreting the social obligation commitment into a productive and steady approach in the worldwide business sector (Paetzold, 2010). The following is to have the capacity to merge the BP its subsidiaries like Arco and Amoco to social investments and the latter are to fulfil and meet the external expectation from the public. These CSR commitments have been reinforced through the progressions or rehash specified above which incorporate their advertisement of the "Beyond Petroleum" (Jasimuddin & Maniruzzaman,…show more content…
It is important for the organisation to make sure that their CSR activities are aligned with the business operations and practices because it aims to minimise the negative impact of the business processes on the society. Moreover, in order to integrate CSR with the business practices, some sort of change was needed in the internal environment, which gave rise to the problem of employee resistance. The employees of British Petroleum were resistant to accept change, as they were not aware with the importance of corporate social responsibility for the success of the business. Therefore, they had to make efforts to convenience employees to accept this change. This demonstrates that integration process of CSR activities, policies, and business processes served as the significant challenge for the British Petroleum (Sharma & Sharma.,
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