Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Treatment

1428 Words6 Pages
In 1980, the term Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) first came into existence in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition (DSM-III). Only in 1987 did the DSM series make reference to traumatized children. The first major studies of the effects of large traumas on children were Bloch's 1956 study of the effect of a tornado in Mississippi, Lacey's 1972 study of the effects of an avalanche on a Welsh school, Newman's 1976 work on the Buffalo Creek disaster and Terr's 1979 research on the Chowchilla bus kidnapping. Psychological "trauma" is defined by the American Psychiatric Association as an experience beyond "the range of usual human experience," that "would be markedly distressing to almost anyone, and is usually experienced with intense fear, terror and helplessness" (DSM-IIIR, p. 247). Some examples include a serious threat to one's life (or that of one's children, spouse, etc.), rape, military combat, natural or accidental disasters, and torture. Sexual activity with an adult would be an example of a traumatic experience for a child. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), as previously defined, is caused by an overwhelming event outside the range of ordinary human experience, such as combat, a natural disaster, or a physical assault. The symptoms include nightmares and other forms of re-experiencing the traumatic event, avoidance of situations and activities that arouse memories of the event, emotional numbness and detachment, pessimism, sleep problems, impulsive anger, jumpiness, and difficulty in concentration. There are many symptoms but there are also many affects to the functioning of an individual. The functioning defects can send an individual into crisis. Memory loss is common a... ... middle of paper ... ...ishes on treatment options. This disorder is typically not fatal however; it has the potential to severely damage someone’s very existence. Get an individual evaluated for the proper medications and therapies and support them on their way to recovering. References M.D., J. A. (n.d.). abess.com index page. abess.com index page. Retrieved February 28, 2011, from http://www.abess.com Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-III-R. (3rd ed.). (1987). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-IV-TR. (4th ed.). (2000). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association. Mayo Clinic. (n.d.). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved February 28, 2011, from http://www.mayoclinic.com Noll, R. (1992). The encyclopedia of schizophrenia and the psychotic disorders. New York: Facts on File.

More about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Treatment

Open Document