Post-Soviet Government And The Free Press

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The Post-soviet countries have begun to build themselves from the ground up, with the hope for a substantial future. As a result of the switch from socialism to capitalism the transition has brought new challenges. In other words, the political democratic stability for the sovereign states became inadequate. It had been standard to view newly democratic nations turned over and became more in support of the western capitalist idea. Although, the new post-soviet states are presumably embracing a democratic ideology, it has been clear that it needs coordination to demonstrate that change. Many people assume that to establish a democracy similar to the United States, you need to give back the control of a nation to the people in the form of free speech. What is happening is on the contrary; a limitation under the pretext how information is passed around, for example national news, non-biased media, is not always accessible in a sovereign state. Along those same lines this lack of information does not favor a country socioeconomically for it does not hold up the idea of democracy. In a theoretical aspect, free speech is essential in establishing a robust economy and in addition a democratic state. So the question I ask is; what is the relation between freedom of Speech and a democracy in Russia Eurasia? For these reasons this research paper is a demonstration of the correlation of how the free press media is important for the development of a state hence the non practice of principles of social equality like freedom of speech. The work I'm specifically looking for is how the media is being oppressed and what factors play a role of controlling this media; at what fault during the transition to a post-soviet society enabled Russia to di... ... middle of paper ... ...ut Freedom of Speech?." Russian Politics & Law 43.1 (2005): 70-76. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 9 Dec. 2009. 1. Richter, Andrei "POST-SOVIET PERSPECTIVE ON CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF THE MEDIA: An Overview." International Communication Gazette 70.5 (2008): 307-324. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 23 Nov. 2009. 2. Roudakova, Natalia "Journalism as “Prostitution”: Understanding Russia's Reactions to Anna Politkovskaya's Murder." Political Communication 26.4 (2009): 412-429. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 23 Nov. 2009. 3. KOVACEVIC, NATASA "Pressing for Change." Harvard International Review 31.1 (2009): 10-11. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 23 Nov. 2009. 4. Mironov, Nikolai "Russia--Democracy Without Freedom of Speech?." Russian Politics & Law 43.1 (2005): 70-76. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 9 Dec. 2009.

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