Positive Childhood Environment

1299 Words6 Pages
Lee Pryke once said, “Life is an accumulation of experiences, leading us back to why we came here in the first place.” Simply, every moment, every detail, every tedious change in life either upholds, molds, or chips at identity, leaving the remaining sculpture a byproduct of life. A time in life when a person is most impressionable and vulnerable to his surroundings is childhood. Furthermore, childhood experiences have long-term, intricate effects and implications on identity, whether positive or negative. During childhood, children are susceptible to their environment, mainly within the structure of the home. Negative events such as abuse, abandonment, substance abuse or trauma not only effect the child at the time, but these events also…show more content…
The nurture in a home, primarily by two supporting parents, gives direction to a child’s life. Often, this direction can be seen through allowing a child to make mistakes and to try to do things on their own, making them independent and responsible. In the book Changing Adolescence: Social Trends and Mental Health, it notes, “Adolescents’ lives are shaped by the social context in which they live…Pressures and expectations arise from several directions at once” (1). When a child is challenged with many choices, namely choices between doing right or wrong, parents…show more content…
It is a proven fact that children are more likely in the future to have the same habits as their parent or guardian, whether positive or negative. For example, if a child saw his two parents respect one another in disagreement rather than verbally attacking one another, he would be more inclined in the future to mimic this act of maturity. Positive experiences, such as being held frequently as a child and having basic needs met: water, food, shelter, and clothing, help to define a sense of security and belonging. This security is needed in the childhood span because it is a pivotal point for a child. If a child is secure during childhood, he is more likely to have healthy, trusting relationships with others when he is older. “In general, adolescence is a complex period characterized by substantial cognitive and emotional changes grounded in the unfolding development of the brain…In particular, adolescents are faced with the task of individuating from their parents (Breiner et al. 9).” If children don’t have the ground of security, they cannot build upon their interests, explore interpersonal relationships, or build key social skills. Thus, their development is stunted and cultivating an identity apart from their parent or guardian is even more difficult. However, parents can help to establish a child’s identity, allowing them to find their own potential in unconventional
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