Popularity and Superficiality in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

656 Words3 Pages
Popularity and Superficiality in Death of a Salesman In Arthur Miller’s Death of A Salesman, Willy Lowman possesses the trait of superficiality. Willy’s priorities are to look good and be liked, and this contributes to his misguided path to reach success. This attribute is one of many societal criticisms pointed out by Miller. Arthur Miller criticizes society for perceiving success as being liked and having good looks. He illustrates society’s perception through Willy, who thinks the keys to success are being popular and attractive. Willy transmits this philosophy to his sons by ignoring their education and personal growth and setting an example that popularity is most important. Willy shows many times that his idea of success goes no deeper than the superficial by teaching his sons the wrong path to a successful life. When Biff was in high school, Willy had already started to teach his son the false values in which he believed. When Willy found out Biff had stolen a football and was caught by his coach, who did not get angry, Willy responded by using the incident as ...

More about Popularity and Superficiality in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman

Open Document