Political Romantics of Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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Political Romantics of Elizabeth Cady Stanton Romantic persuasion enters all genres of literature. At the time of the American Renaissance romanticism became a prominent aspect of writing. It was a time of change not just in literature, but in the political arena. The political turmoil of the time created a new venue for writers with views of a utopian society. These author's, with their ideals, became a catalyst for the continuing changes of today. This cunning use of language, whether intentional or accidental, continues today. Political change comes not just from thought provoking words, but from gaining the emotions of those hearing the words. During a time in need of sweeping political change an arena is created which can serve a romantic heart well. Whether this heart is seen as romantic or warrior-like it is the passionate wording that entrances the reader. Elizabeth Cady Stanton's work, while seen as political, speaks not just to the mind, but the heart as well. Choosing her language carefully serves two intents, demanding change and evoking desire in the reader to assist in the changes. It is this ability to create desire that makes Stanton an influential writer. Elizabeth Cady was one of eleven children born into a time in history when women had no voice. After the death of her oldest brother Stanton's father commented, "Oh, my daughter, I wish you were a boy!" (Heath 2031). From this early time she was reminded of her limitations, but refused to accept the restrictions. Stanton went so far as to have the word "obey" omitted from her marriage vows to Henry Brewster Stanton. This formidable personality coupled with an eloquent writing ability led her into politics. It is Stanton's language ... ... middle of paper ... ... Ellen. Century of Struggle: The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1996. King, Martin Luther. "I Have a Dream." A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings of Martin Luther King, Jr. Ed. J. M. Washington. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1986. 217-220. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. "The American Scholar." The Heath Anthology of American Literature Third Edition. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. 1610. Stanton, Elizabeth Cady. "from Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences." The Heath Anthology of American Literature Third Edition. Ed. Paul Lauter. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. 2031-2033. Stanton, Elizabeth Cady. "The Solitude of Self." The Female Experience: An American Documentary. Ed. Gerda Lerner. New York: Oxford University Press, 1977. 490-493.

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