Plagiarism In The Digital Age

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“Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age” New York Times journalist, Trip Gabriel, puts into perspective students ability to use their creativity throughout their academic career in “Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age.” This article discusses issues of plagiarism in the digital age, especially through college students. There are different perspectives from various people either attending college or professors that argue why plagiarism occurs. Whether it’s because of laziness, unpreparedness going into college, originality, or authorship not taken into consideration. Overall, this article infers the different standpoints of plagiarism, demonstrating the ease the digital age gives students to plagiarize, and the importance…show more content…
Plagiarism as Ms. Wilensky, an undergraduate of Indiana University, is like that, “you’re not coming up with new ideas if you’re grabbing and mixing and matching.” Plagiarism doesn’t allow the reader to know how someone truly feels about a subject, it is assumed that they need to have a certain view or idea to be considered correct. I agree with Ms. Wilensky, she understands that plagiarism in academia, “does not foster creativity, it fosters laziness.” If students are “taught to synthesize (information) into their own original argument . . . you’re not tempted to plagiarize in college.” (Wilensky) Allowing students to voice their opinion is crucial in academia, so conflict of plagiarism does not arise in college and lead to expulsion. Though, the shift from high school to college can be…show more content…
Blum of the University of Notre Dame states, "undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique and authentic identity, than in trying on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking," which correlates with plagiarism in the digital age, usually in middle and high school students are forced into the traditionally strict five-paragraph essay with no opinion on the topic, whatsoever. Their only resource for concrete information is digital technology. However, once their opinion is inquired, difficulties to break away from the five-paragraph essay, and giving one 's opinion arise. As a first year college student, being told to “put in your oar,” or one’s opinion still taking into consideration other person 's views, joining the conversation in one 's essay is something completely new. In high school, students were told “ the one’s reading your essay don’t care about your opinion, they just want the facts, period.” Even though it may be difficult at first because one may care too much what others think and may not be putting in their oar but build upon others ideas/views. It 's refreshing knowing one has the ability to voice their opinion and join the conversation, even if the essay will be graded. Without the proper use of digital technology, students are prone to commit plagiarism that can detrimental to their future. I say, there are many positives to the digital age and that if the conversation of plagiarism started
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