Physical And Physical Teaching: An Introduction To Physical Education

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FACULTY OF EDUCATION KATIMA MULILO CAMPUS STUDENT NAME MATONGO M.C STUDENT NUMBER 201612422 MODULE NAME PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 2 MODULE CODE MPU3721 LECTURER`S NAME M.R KELA G Introduction Physical education is an integral part of the educative process. The activities of physical education can promote the health of learners as a subject. Cognitive socio-effective growth of human beings for quality life (Holst, 1993), as extracted from the article from Kerry`s web page of teaching styles. Nowadays physical education focuses on all domains of learning, unlike…show more content…
Through the teaching method it will be known if learners are involved or they are given ways on how to do certain activities or movements. Learners have to be involved in the lesson as they are the reasons for the lesson; they have to be given knowledge and have to understand how they got that knowledge. Learners learn best if they are involved in the lesson and when they are able to touch or do the experiment. Learners understand better if they imitate what they are learning; if it is a demonstration, let them demonstrate for them to keep it in their minds and for them to be able to demonstrate it next time on their…show more content…
The teacher makes decisions in this type of teaching style. Decision on what to do, how to do it and the level of achievement expected are determined by the teacher (Nichols, 1994). The teacher demonstrates to show the learners what is expected from them or how they must perform, the teacher also gives emphasis and explains specific important points of the movement. Learners observe the skills cues of the task and are given an opportunity to see how the skills are performed accurately through the demonstration of the teacher. After the demonstration, learners are guided on how to do various steps in carrying out the activity. Several repetitions of the performance are done as learners put the movements in the chronological order and timing. If it is necessary the teacher makes additional appropriate and helpful comments to a certain learner or to a group or even to a class as a whole. A few examples of the command style are; instructing a dance step, teaching a child how to overhand throw. This type of approach often fails to foster deeper learning, as learners find such approaches uninspiring and therefore reproduce movement to avoid reprimand (West and Bucher,
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