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Persuasive Essay On Losing Weight

opinionated Essay
1115 words
1115 words
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One of the most sought-after approaches to changing one’s life for the better is the notion and idea of losing weight. It has been told as many times as the sun has risen that being overweight causes an increased likelihood of a heart attack and diabetes. Being overweight leads to a whole complexity of problems the likes of which I will not address here. Now, most of us can tell if we are overweight by looking in a mirror or by considering the size or tightness of our clothes. The day comes when we swear off food and decide that we are going to rid ourselves of this additional weight. It is understand that losing weight involves abstaining ourselves from gorging on sweets and pies.
What if a research suggested that eating chocolate as part of a relatively low-carb diet would still result in weight loss? What if it eating chocolate not only caused weight-loss but also caused an easier and more successful …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that losing weight is one of the most sought-after approaches to changing one's life for the better.
  • Describes the benefits of eating chocolate as part of a relatively low-carb diet, and explains that most people would buy out their year’s supply of chocolate.
  • Explains that a 2015 study suggested eating 42 grams of chocolate with an 81% cocoa content led to more weight loss than another participating group. this study was based on real results with real data.
  • Explains that although the study proved that eating chocolate regularly causes a substantial weight loss, there were some problems with the sample size, and the research measured too many factors.
  • Explains that there is a lot of noise in bodyweight. chips and soda cause weight loss, but they don't.
  • Opines that there are numerous websites out there that will blast your research out to hundreds of news reporting sites without even using an outside expert to weigh in on the research.
  • Explains that bohannon, the lead scientist behind this experiment, knew that these websites would publish his experiment. the idea was to test not whether it would get published, but would journalists pick it up and turn it into a big story.
  • Explains that bohannon didn't run the experiment knowing that weight loss would be the conclusive results. instead of headlines reading "chocolate causes weight-loss," the scientists would have dually published that paper.
  • Analyzes how bohannon knew that weight loss would be the result of the experiment, which might have played a factor in the speed at which small-town websites regurgitated the idea.
  • Explains that there is a crisis in academic publishing. telling the difference between the good guys and the bad guys is still demanding.
  • Opines that people rely on tv or reporting news websites because that’s how they keep up-to-date. how is the public supposed to know what they are reading is scientifically accurate?
  • Opines that the diet nutrition newsbeat is a sham. there is not enough scientific consensus around the connection between what you eat and health outcomes.
  • Opines that if the story seems to give you advice, such as eat this and don’t consume, the best advice would be to stop reading.
  • Opines that the scientific consensus has not crystallized around diet and human health outcomes to the degree that you can make any claims yet.
  • Opines that bohannon's goal is not to embarrass individual reporters who picked up the chocolate study, but to target bigger targets.
  • Opines that real scientific work on nutrition and health is often incremental, inconclusive or contradictory, not the source of easy answers and sexy headlines.

They now actually have to do their job. You have to tap outside sources. You have to do some reporting. Dig into the story. Find out if all adds up.
What happened? No reporter who wrote about this did any of this.
What about the general public? What is the take-away for viewers? A lot of people rely on TV or reporting news websites because that’s how they keep up to date. Most use cell phones or other electronic equipment. How is the general public at large supposed to know what they are reading is scientifically accurate? What can they do?
Here is the answer. If you are reading a news story and it seems to be telling you what to eat, don’t believe it. It is that simple. There is just not enough scientific consensus around the connection between what you eat and health outcomes. This whole enterprise, the diet nutrition newsbeat is a sham.
If the story seems to be giving you advice, such as eat this and don’t eat that you could stop reading. Once these stories start being very specific on what you can and cannot do, the best advice would be to stop

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