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Pay Inequity and Sex Discrimination in America

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Even though the treatment and working conditions of the workers have significantly improved since the Industrial Revolution, some of those problems still linger today in American occupations. Women are still paid less than men, despite the fact that they share the same job. They are viewed as feeble people who do lighter tasks than men do. On another issue, jobs that include cutting meat with a sharp knife in a slaughterhouse make workers operate in compact spaces. While most Americans avoid doing dirty jobs, undocumented immigrants will seek refuge in them. Because the workers’ gender and legal status determines their worth in the workplace, it prevents them from having a satisfying job.
Employers assume that women are not capable of doing much work, causing them to get paid less. Almost a century ago, a majority of the women worked in “lightweight” jobs as nurses, teachers, or in textile factories. Doing masculine jobs that usually required physical work was discouraged or prohibited from women. Today in American society, women can obtain masculine jobs such as police officers, soldiers, or firefighters. However, in some jobs that include female workers, women earn less than men do in the same job. Hazel Dews has been a janitor for twenty-five years, working five days a week. Besides running a scrub machine, she has the same responsibilities as the male janitors do. She cleans and vacuums the floor, as well as pushes a trash truck. Despite working for almost three decades and doing the same tasks as men do, Dews earns $22,000 a year while men earn $30,000. Additionally, men can advance five ranks in the career, while women can only advance by two ranks (Barko 617). Regardless of her experience as a janitor, she still earns...

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...ns to become almost unbearable as they struggle to support their family. They are given a lot of work in such poor working conditions. However, both voices can be heard if they join unions and fight to change the rights.

Works Cited

Carter, Stephen. The Rules about the Rules. The Presence of Others: Voices and Images That Call for Response. 5th ed. Ed. Andrea Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Boston: Bedford, 2008. 178-88. Print.
Clayton, Mark. A Whole Lot of Cheatin’ Going On. The Presence of Others: Voices and Images That Call for Response. 5th ed. Ed. Andrea Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Boston: Bedford, 2008. 198-02. Print.
King, Martin Luther, Jr.. Letter from Birmingham Jail. The Presence of Others: Voices and Images That Call for Response. 5th ed. Ed. Andrea Lunsford and John J. Ruszkiewicz. Boston: Bedford, 2008. 163-76. Print.
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