Parallelism In Huckleberry Finn

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel and sequel through which Mark Twain weaves a consistent theme regarding the battle of right versus wrong. Twain presents Huckleberry Finn, or simply Huck, as the main character who finds himself on a current-driven journey down the Mississippi River to escape the abuse of his alcoholic father. The encounters of Huck and Jim, the escaped slave of the widow Mrs. Watson, serve as a catalyst for the moral based decisions in this MORAL-riddled novel. Mark Twain is considered one of America 's most highly regarded literary icons. He upholds this status by utilizing parallelism to include bits of information about himself in the novel. Throughout the story, Twain keeps a sort of idol-influenced motivation…show more content…
Specifically, both Huck and Mark lacked a paternal figure for a portion of their childhoods. The reasoning behind the absences, however, are clearly not identical for the former 's lack of a father figure was a result of alcoholic-induced abuse. Additionally, Huck and Twain both grew to become very familiar with the Mississippi River at a young age. One of the many activities in which teenage Twain took a liking was working along the river as a steamboat pilot. Therefore, it is no surprise that Huck navigates with ease as he makes his way down the same beck. Twain 's early learning of the river 's bends and general layout allowed him to effectively apply this experience-based knowledge to the novel through detailed descriptions of the river at certain locations and times. The apparent similarities between Huckleberry Finn and Mark Twain in addition to the correspondence between their backgrounds are but a few instances in which Twain incorporates bits of his own life into the underlying foundation of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. “... he wrote Huck 's story in the first person and at so many crucial places in the book became Huck” (Kazin – AFTERWORD IN THE BOOK) (. (ADD A BIOGRAPHY…show more content…
When Tom said he “wanted to resk it” and “tie Jim to the tree for fun,” Huck disliked the idea of disturbing Jim after getting away unnoticed, proving that Tom is more daring than Huck. When everyone in Tom Sawyer 's Gang questioned the purpose behind their plans to rob and murder, Tom replied that “it 's in the books...”, implying that Tom has read multiple books as opposed to Huck who is barely literate. Twain manipulates their characters so that Tom is the more bold, outgoing, and socially-rounded when compared to Huck. However, Twain does not outline all the differences between Tom and Huck for naught. They help highlight special characteristics about Huck that show his character 's positive contribution to the novel. Such characteristics include his kindness and sense of
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