Overview of Esophageal Cancer

1423 Words6 Pages
The scientific definition for cancer is a disorder in which the body cell loses their ability to control growth. Cancer cells do not respond to the signals that regulate the growth of most cells, which means they divide uncontrollably. Cancer cells are different from healthy cells because they do not die but continue to divide. Cancer disrupts the cell cycle because of this. The infected cells absorb the nutrients other cells need, block nerve connections, and prevent the organs they invade from doing their job. Cancer is life threatening because the balances in the body are disrupted, and life-threatening illnesses occur. There are over 100 different types of cancers. (Miller and Levine, Miller & Levine Biology) ("What Is Cancer?") Cancer can run in some families, but it is usually not hereditary. About five to ten percent of cancers are passed down from generation to generation, but usually it is a defective gene that is inherited. Cancer is caused by a defect in genes that control cell growth and division. Things like smoking, chewing tobacco, and radiation exposure can cause these defects. Most cancer cells have a defect in the gene called p53. This gene is very important in the cell cycle and apoptosis. The gene stops the cell cycle until all the chromosomes have been duplicated right, but when it is defective or damaged it makes cells lose their information needed to respond to signals that normally control growth. (Miller and Levine, Miller & Levine Biology) ("Heredity and Cancer") The cancer I chose is Esophageal Cancer. It is a cancer that forms in the tissues along the esophagus. There are two types of esophageal cancer; one is called squamous cell carcinoma, which is cancer that starts in flat cells along the esophagu... ... middle of paper ... .... Web. 19 Jan. 2014. "Heredity and Cancer." Heredity and Cancer. American Cancer Society, 28 Mar. 2013. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. "How Is Cancer of the Esophagus Diagnosed?" How Is Cancer of the Esophagus Diagnosed? American Cancer Society, 18 Jan. 2013. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. Miller, Kenneth R., and Joseph S. Levine. Miller & Levine Biology. Boston, MA: Pearson, 2010. Print. "National Cancer Institute." Esophageal Cancer Home Page -. National Institutes of Health, n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. "National Cancer Institute." What You Need To Know About Cancer of the Esophagus -. National Institutes of Health, 4 Apr. 2013. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. "National Cancer Institute." What You Need To Know About Cancer of the Esophagus -. National Institutes of Health, 4 Apr. 2013. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. "What Is Cancer?" What Is Cancer? American Cancer Society, 21 Mar. 2012. Web. 19 Jan. 2014.

More about Overview of Esophageal Cancer

Open Document