Optometry Case Study

1597 Words7 Pages
Of the multitude of careers in the health care industry, optometry has one of the greatest outlooks with regards to future employment and need, largely due to the health care requirements of the aging population. Optometry has several different modes of practice to choose from, including private practice, commercial, hospital, and community health centers to name a few. To further investigate private practice optometry, I shadowed Dr. Stuart Anderson in Gladstone, Missouri. Dr. Anderson is a member of the first graduating class of the University of Missouri Saint Louis College of Optometry and has been practicing optometry for 32 years. He owns a successful private practice, Anderson and Nutt, and throughout his career, has established himself…show more content…
Anderson at his practice because he has created both a professional and personal lifestyle that I hope to accomplish for myself. Aside from optometry, Dr. Anderson is also a leader in the community, as he serves on the board of the Platte County Board of Services. His involvement and dedication to this board, which provides services to special needs adults in the community, represents his commitment to his family, as his oldest son is autistic. Dr. Anderson frequently brings up his children in conversation and is able to make time in his schedule to take the family on beautiful vacations throughout the year. As stated in Business Aspects of Optometry (2010), a vital part of future success is planning and goal setting (p. 18-19). In order to achieve the future you desire, you must plan for it and set specific goals; in order to set goals, you must know what you want. Though it can be defined in several different ways, put simply, “success is getting what you want,” (p. 19). Thus, I chose a suburban, private practice office to conduct my shadowing so that I would be able to better outline my goals and aspirations for my professional career. Demonstrated in the following paragraphs is the knowledge I gained regarding practice management in a private practice optometric…show more content…
Dr. Anderson was successfully able to see a large number of patients per day, largely in part due to the help of staff members. Technicians perform pretesting on patients (including visual acuity testing and Optos imaging) and then direct patients to seats in the hall. This patient flow opens more chairs in the waiting room/dispensary and ensures that patients are ready to be seen by the doctor at the time of their appointment. Unfortunately, these chairs are immediately outside of the exam room, which necessitates exam room doors be completely shut for privacy. Overall, this process was a creative way of increasing the number of exams per day without increasing the number of exam lanes needed. Additional practice management advice gained was Dr. Anderson’s opinion on instrument importance and productivity. New optometry graduates must prioritize purchases due to large amounts of student debt and limited funding. Interestingly, Dr. Anderson advocated that the Optos retinal imaging instrument was his favorite and most profitable instrument. He explained that this technology provides a wow factor for patients, while also cutting down on exam time. For non-medical, routine exams, the retinal imaging allows for a complete exam without dilation (an added bonus for patients as well!). Furthermore, the advanced technology allows for sustained viewing of the retina and provides an opportunity for
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