One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

582 Words3 Pages
In the 1950’s, mental hospitals weren’t what they are now. In Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, he shows how people in mental hospitals were treated at that time all through the eyes of an Indian man named Chief Bromden. Ken Kesey uses his personal experiences to add settings and even characters to show this in his writing. His life is clearly seen by McMurphy’s problem with authority which goes perfectly with his own and by the setting of a mental hospital, which Kesey once worked in. Ken Kesey and McMurphy both experience life in a mental hospital. In chapter 1, in order to escape his prison sentence, McMurphy said he was insane. (Kesey). The result of this was being enrolled in a mental hospital. Kesey, in order to get more money, signed up for an experimental drug test run by the government. He then began working with the patients at the Menlo Park Veterans Hospital in the psychiatric ward. “Kesey worked the night shift at the Menlo Park Veterans Hospital where he earned extra money taking LSD and other psychedelic drugs for medical studies.” (Wieman). Ken Kesey uses his own personal experiences with working in a mental hospital to create McMurphy and recreates his story with this character. During his time working there, he has seen the things that they did to the patients that are not legal to do now, which he included in this book. He also began to have hallucinations of an Indian man sweeping the floors which he used for the idea of chief bromden. Ken Kesey and McMurphy both did not think the patients they encountered were as crazy as people thought. They both also became friends with them. Kesey uses his experience with befriending the patients to create McMurphy and his friends... ... middle of paper ... ...ul. Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. N.p.: Taylor & Francis, n.d. Literary Reference Center. Web. 8 Apr. 2014. The Oregon History Project. Oregon Historical Society, n.d. Web. 2 May 2014. . Reilly, Edward C., and David W. Cole. Ken Kesey. N.p.: Salem, n.d. Literary Reference Center. Web. 7 Apr. 2014. Waxler, Robert. “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Changing Lives Through Literature. U of Massachusetts, 2003. Web. 9 Apr. 2014. . Waxler, Robert P. The Mixed Heritage of the Chief: Revisiting the Problem of Manhood in One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. N.p.: Wiley-Blackwell, n.d. Literary Reference Center. Web. 8 Apr. 2014. Wieman, Chris. It’s All a Kind of Magic: The Young Ken Kesey. N.p.: Media Source, n.d. Literary Reference Center. Web. 8 Apr. 2014.
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