Oh the Irony!

790 Words4 Pages
The use of irony is widely applied today in our films, conversations, and literature. Irony can be helpful in the aspect of literature when depicting between illusion and reality. In “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce and in “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne, there are examples that can be seen of how irony is used in stories. “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is a story of a man by the name of Peyton Farquhar. This man is involuntarily at Owl Creek Bridge waiting to be hanged but before passing away, he envisioned himself escaping his death and seeing his family. “Young Goodman Brown” is also of a young man who just married to a woman with the name of Faith. Further into the story, it appears that the man went on a journey and through his journey he learned that not everything is how it seems. The authors of these stories have included the use of irony to determine the difference between illusion and reality.
In short story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge,” Ambrose Bierce presents us with an interesting story that lures any reader at the start of it. The protagonist of the story is about to be hanged to his death but is daydreaming beforehand and during the scene. Everything that is happening to him physically, or in reality, affects his daydreaming.
In other words, when Bierce casts about for a psychologically rea[l]istic structure for the intimate experience of the mind undergoing death, he chooses this model of the dream as the most proximate and familiar, consistently weaving external stimuli into the details of Farquhar's dream narrative of escape in almost, but not entirely, unrecognizable form. (Stoicheff)
Taking what Stoicheff has proposed, the man could feel what was going on around ...

... middle of paper ...

...hings that did not match with his dream, it would not be so certain that it was in fact a dream and not reality.

Works Cited

Stoicheff, Peter. "Something uncanny': the dream structure in Ambrose Bierce's 'An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." Studies in Short Fiction 30.3 (1993): 349+. Academic OneFile. Web. 17 Feb. 2014.
Jamil, S. Selina. "Carnivalesque freedom in Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown." The Explicator 65.3 (2007): 143+. Academic OneFile. Web. 20 Feb. 2014.
Bierce, Ambrose. “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge.” Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing. Ed. Edgar V. Roberts and Robert Zweig. 5th Compact ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2012. 6-13.Print
Hawthorne, Nathaniel. “Young Goodman Brown.” Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing. Ed. Edgar V. Roberts and Robert Zweig. 5th Compact ed. New York: Pearson Longman, 2012. 6-13.Print
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