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Nuclear Superweapons

Satisfactory Essays
People need to Know and understand the benefits and dangers of nuclear weapons. The two main types of nuclear weapons are the more commonly known atom bomb, and the less commonly known hydrogen bomb. Nuclear weapons have had a very important role in the history of the world, whether it was used, as seen in Nagasaki and Hiroshima, or used as a deterrent. However the presence of nuclear weapons comes with a down fall, the threat of a nuclear war is always going to be present.
The need for a nuclear bomb became present in 1941 after the attack on Pearl Harbor when the United States entered World War 2. Albert Einstein and Enrico Fermi who were the fathers of the Manhattan Project. Einstein and Fermi were worried about what would happen if the Axis powers got their hands on an atomic bomb (US History.com). An atom bomb works by firing stray neutrons at closely pact uranium atoms. When the neutrons hit the uranium atom, the atom splits apart releasing energy and more neutrons causing more atom separations, thus causing a nuclear reaction gone critical (Wisegeek.com). It wasn’t until 1945 when the atomic bomb was completed. There were many prototypes for the atomic bomb one of the methods used to create the atomic bomb was to use plutonium, an artificial element which is heavier then uranium 235. Plutonium is made when a uranium 238 atom, which cannot undergo nuclear fission, absorbs a stray neutron turning it into u-239, then decays into plutonium 239 (nuclearweaponarchive.org). The first atomic bomb was completed on July 16, 1945, it was tested in Alamogordo, New Mexico under the code name “Trinity” (Atom Central). Atomic bomb testing didn’t end after the end of World War 2, the United States tested a total of 1,032 nuclear bombs fr...

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