preview

Nosocomial Infections In Hospital

explanatory Essay
1649 words
1649 words
bookmark

Nosocomial infections Nosocomial infections are those that originate or occur in a hospital or hospital-like situation. The development of such infections is favored by a hospital environment, such as one picked up by a patient during a hospital visit or one developing among hospital staff. Such infections include fungal and bacterial infections. They are mostly provoked by the reduced resistance of individual patients. A nosocomial infection, is also known as a HAI (Hospital-Acquired Infection). Factors leading to nosocomial infections Factors that lead to the efficient transmission of nosocomial infections include: 1. High frequency of pathogens 2. High prevalence of compromised hosts 3. Proficient mechanisms of transmission from patient to patient These three factors lead not just to a higher likelihood of transmission of pathogens within hospitals, but also to the evolution of potentially virulent strain of microorganisms commonly found in hospitals. Nosocomial infections are blamable for about 20,000 deaths in the U.S. per year. Approximately 10% of American hospital patients (about 2 million every year) acquire a clinically noteworthy nosocomial infection. Transmission of nosocomial infections Nosocomial infections are commonly transmitted when hospital officials become self-righteous and personnel do not practice appropriate hygiene regularly. Also, increased use of outpatient treatment in recent decades means that a greater percentage of people who are hospitalized today are likely to be seriously ill with more weakened immune systems than in the past. Moreover, some medical procedures bypass the body's natural protective barriers. Since medical staff move from patient to patient, the staff themselves serve as a means f... ... middle of paper ... ...ics used to treat MRSA infections. Treatment of MRSA infection with vancomycin can be complex, due to its inconvenient route of administration. Moreover, many clinicians believe that the effectiveness of vancomycin against MRSA is quite low as compared to the anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Several recently discovered strains of MRSA show antibiotic resistance even to vancomycin and teicoplanin. These new evolutions of the MRSA bacterium have been designated as Vancomycin intermediate-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VISA). Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, ceftaroline, and tigecycline are used to treat more severe infections that do not react to glycopeptides such as vancomycin. Current guidelines commend daptomycin for VISA bloodstream infections and endocarditis. Conclusion:-

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that nosocomial infections originate or occur in a hospital or hospital-like situation. they include fungal and bacterial infections.
  • Explains that nosocomial infections are commonly transmitted when hospital officials become self-righteous and personnel do not practice appropriate hygiene regularly.
  • Explains that many mrsa infections occur in hospitals and healthcare facilities. rates are also increased in hospitalized patients who are treated with quinolones.
  • Explains that mrsa infection becomes serious if it penetrates deeper in the skin or in blood.
  • Opines that one should avoid puncturing oneself with anything and minimize exposure to sharp instruments, especially body fluid-contaminated instruments.
  • Explains the importance of not exposing patients to body fluids (e.g., weeping dermatitis) of others, such as that of health care workers.
  • Explains that patient screening with nasal cultures prevents cohabitation of mrsa carriers with non-carriers, and exposure to infected surfaces. in the us and canada, the centers for disease control and prevention issued recommendations on october 19, 2006.
  • Explains that hand washing uk nhs initiated a ‘clean your hands’ campaign in september 2004.
  • Explains that these three factors lead to a higher likelihood of transmission of pathogens within hospitals and the evolution of potentially virulent strains of microorganisms commonly found in hospitals.
  • Explains that mrsa is a strain of staphylococcus aureus that has developed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins and the cephalosporins.
  • Explains that the first reported cases of ca-mrsa (community acquired) appeared in the mid-1990s in australia, new zealand, the united states, france, finland, canada and samoa.
  • Explains that alcohol is an effective surface sanitizer against mrsa. the prevention of nosocomial infections involves routine and terminal cleaning.
  • Explains that current us guidance does not require workers with mrsa infections to be routinely omitted from the general workplace.
  • Analyzes the antimicrobial action of ulmo 90 and manuka umf 25+ honey against several microorganisms, including mrsa.
  • Explains that vancomycin and teicoplanin are glycopeptide antibiotics used to treat mrsa infections.
Get Access