preview

Nonviolence or Violence: Which Was More Effective?

Powerful Essays
The Civil Rights Movement brought many accomplishments to African Americans such as the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Fair Housing Act of 1968. The key issues that African Americans fought for were voting rights, integration and racial equality. They were tired of the discrimination and humiliation they received as a result of the segregation laws imposed on them. “State laws mandated racial separation in schools, parks, playgrounds, restaurants, hotels, public transportation, theaters, restrooms and so on” (Blumberg 40). Lawsuits had been tried to gain rights such as the unsuccessful Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896 and the successful Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Although, the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka declared the “separate but equal” clause unconstitutional, de facto segregation continued in the South. During the 1960s, two methods were used: nonviolence and violence. Violence proved to be ineffective since it perpetuated social tensions among Whites and Blacks. Nonviolence was the most effective method in bringing social change in America during the 1960s Civil Rights Movement because it attracted sympathy towards Black people, provoked positive media attention, and promoted unity among African Americans. The use of violence during the Civil Rights Movement proved to be ineffective because it furthered social tensions between Whites and Blacks. The people who generated violence were mainly the Black Panthers advocating Black Power. Black Power called for nationality, unity, self-pride, self-defense and the separation from the White race (Blumberg 9). The idea of separation of the White race competed with integration since Black Power wanted “African Americans to establish their own ... ... middle of paper ... ... Smith. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2010. ABC-CLIO eBook Collection. Web. 27 May 2011. Mark, Irving. Great Debates U.S.A. Morristown: Silver Burdett Company, 1969. Stephens, Otis H. Jr. John M. Scheb II. "Civil Rights Movement." Encyclopedia of American Civil Rights and Liberties: Volume 1, A-G. Ed. John M. Scheb, Kara Stooksbury, Otis H. Stephens. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2006. ABC-CLIO eBook Collection. Web. 25 May 2011. Ware, Leland. “Black Power Movement.” Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture. Ed. Jessie Carney Smith. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2010. ABC- CLIO eBook Collection. Web. 26 May 2011. Ware, Leland. “Carmichael Stokely (Kwame Ture) (1941-98), Civil Rights Activist.” Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture. Ed. Jessie Carney Smith. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, 2010. ABC-CLIO eBook Collection. Web. 26 May 2011.
Get Access