Negative Themes In The Great Gatsby

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F. Scott Fitzgerald 's classic tale of the American dream, The Great Gatsby, is a well known and well loved story. Though many people are familiar with the plot, few take the time to study the depth that has been written into the world of the novel. Set in the post-war, celebratory time of the 1920s, the readers are taken through the bustling lives of a handful of well-off characters. Despite the glamourous lives the characters lead, there are a number of negative themes that can be traced throughout the book. These themes include hostility, ignorance and failure. Characters were unable to think rationally, understand situations, or reach their goals. Compared to the fast-paced setting of New York, these less than appealing traits and accomplishments…show more content…
Ignorance is used in the context of characters being unaware of or overlooking their surroundings. For instance, where Tom had showed violence toward Myrtle, there was an underlying innocence. Tom thought he was capable of doing whatever he wanted. It did not occur to him that any problems would come from him keeping both a wife and mistress. He truly believed that even if Daisy found out about Myrtle, she would still love him and stay with him. It took Myrtle’s tragic death and the threat of Daisy leaving him to show that he was not exempt from the consequences of his lacking…show more content…
His utmost desire is for Daisy to leave her family and marry him, but he pays little attention to the realistic details of his situation. To begin, he expects nothing less than for Daisy to tell her husband she has never loved him. Not only would that be a lie, Gatsby cannot wrap his mind around Daisy wanting anyone other than him. Then, when introduced to Pammy, Gatsby realized that Daisy could not just drop everything and leave her family. If she left, there would be endless problems involving things like custody and whether or not Gatsby could become a
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